CBRE Carbon Calculator

CBRE is committed to helping you make a difference in the fight against global warming, providing a simple tool to calculate your personal carbon footprint and empower you to become a more efficient consumer.

Get Your Footing

The choices you make in your home, your travel, the food you eat and what you buy and throw out determine your carbon footprint – the amount of CO2 and other greenhouse gases required to support these daily activities. To reduce the size of your footprint, you must first know where you stand!

Start Now

Start by selecting the number of people in your home, then choose for yourself or your household. A few clicks, and the carbon calculator does the rest, providing a clear view of your estimated emissions – and the power to reduce your impact through the purchase of carbon offsets.

What state do you live in? Please choose your state.

There are
Please choose the number of people in your household.
people in my household.

Calculate for Me Only Calculate for My Household
Please choose "Calculate for Me Only" or "Calculate for My Household".

Home Energy


Electricity

Tons of CO2 eq/year
0
My typical summer electric use is
/ month
My typical winter electric use is
/ month more info
Electricity use often varies seasonally, depending on what fuel you use for heating and cooling. Provide the average electricity for the six-month period that includes your cooling season (summer), generally April - September, and the average for the six-month period that includes your heating season, generally October - March.

Other Fuels

 
Select the other fuels that are used in your home, and enter the amount you used in the past year.
0
more info
Natural gas use for the past year, available from your utility bill statements. For reference, an average U.S. home will use about 5 therms per month in warm weather, and 90 or more therms per month in cold weather.
0
gallons more info
Fuel oil use over the past year, available from your delivery bill statements. For reference, an average U.S. home in a cool climate will use about 900 gallons of fuel oil per year.
0
gallons more info
Propane use over the past year, available from your delivery bill statements. For reference, an average U.S. home in a cool climate will use about 1200 gallons of propane per year.

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Total Greenhouse Gas Emissions:
?
Tons of CO2 eq/year.
That's 0% of avg.
Home Energy
Use Total:
?
Tons of CO2 eq/year.
That's 0% of avg.

Transportation


Driving

Tons of CO2 eq/year
0
IWe drive a vehicle
roughly miles/ more info
Add vehicle
Select the most appropriate vehicle type based on the average miles per gallon (mpg) fuel consumption for your vehicle. "Hybrid" refers to vehicles that use a hybrid gas / electric drive system. The type of vehicle that you drive and the number of miles driven can have a significant impact on your overall greenhouse gas emissions.

If you have more than one vehicle, click the "Add vehicle" link. This calculator supports up to three vehicles.
0
IWe drive a vehicle
roughly miles/
add vehicle
0
IWe drive a vehicle
roughly miles/

Flying

0
Number of long round trips/year
Number of short round trips/year more info
All flights are round trip per person and should include just personal travel. If two people fly on the same trip, it is considered two trips.

Consider a short flight to be less than 1.5 hours (300 miles) each way.

Public Transportation

0
IWe commute by
roughly / more info
Enter the number of miles that you use public transportation. While using public transportation uses significantly less greenhouse gas emissions, the personal percentage of your travel on bus, train, or subway is calculated here.

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Total Greenhouse Gas Emissions:
?
Tons of CO2 eq/year.
That's 0% of avg.
Driving, Flying & Public Transportation Total:
?
Tons of CO2 eq/year.
That's 0% of avg.

Lifestyle


Food & Diet

Tons of CO2 eq/year
0
Estimated Impact more info
This number is calculated based on an average American diet. Significant modifiers, such as vegan or vegetarian dietary choices, or organic food choices, are shown below as reductions to this number. Other factors, such as locally sourcing food, may also have a significant impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

0
How often do you have vegetarian meals? more info
Always Often Sometimes Rarely
Consider both at-home meals and dining out in your answer.

Strict vegans and vegetarians should choose "Always".

If you have a vegetarian diet that often includes milk and eggs, select "Often".

If the meat you eat is primarily poultry and or you don't eat much meat at all, select "Often".

If you eat a variety of meats, but don't avoid red meat or fish, select "Sometimes".

If you eat meat frequently, or primarily red meat or fish, select "Rarely".
0
How often do you eat low-intensity organic meals? more info
Most meals Sometimes Rarely
Not all food can be obtained organically, and that which can may not be available all of the time.

Consider both dining out and at-home meals for your answer.

If you seek out organic food as your first choice for all of your meals, select "Most meals".

If you buy organic for some choices, but pass on others, select "Sometimes".

If you do not consider organic options, or frequently pass on organic choices, select "Rarely".

Recycling & Waste

0
Estimated Impact more info
Our waste stream contributes to greenhouse gas emissions directly and indirectly. In selecting information on recycling and compost, also consider items that you re-use, re-buy (as second hand or used items), or re-purpose (convert an unusable item into a new one). This number is an estimate based on U.S. average lifestyle, and modifiers to this number are given for recycling and composting.

0
How often do you recycle? more info
All materials recyclable Some of the waste Rarely
Your county or city solid waste management facility may have a list of all locally recyclable or reclaimable materials.

If you typically recycle everything that you know is recyclable, select "All materials".

If you don't make it a habit to recycle at least some of your waste, select "Rarely".

Anything in between may be considered "Some of the waste".
0
Do you compost food scraps and yard trimmings? more info
When possible Sometimes Rarely
If you divert most of your household's food and yard waste into compost, you avoid a sizable portion of your household's waste. Select "When possible".

If you have a compost bin or pile and use it from time to time, select "Sometimes".

If you do not compost, select "Rarely".

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Total Greenhouse Gas Emissions:
?
Tons of CO2 eq/year.
That's 0% of avg.
Food, Diet, Recycling & Waste Total:
?
Tons of CO2 eq/year.
That's 0% of avg.

Emissions Comparison

Tons of CO2 eq/year

?
Your Estimated Emissions
?
United States Average
?
World Average

Your Results

(Calculated for me only)(Calculated for my household)
How was my carbon footprint calculated?

Your estimated greenhouse gas emissions are ? tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent per year, which is below the U.S. national average.

Carbon Offsets

Reduce your impact on the environment by offsetting your carbon footprint. Learn more

Your contribution to a carbon offset program helps to fund projects that produce measurable reductions in greenhouse gasses. Projects help to stem the tide of climate change and protect habitats and the natural services they provide. As trees grow and sequester carbon, it will take up to 70 years to realize your current offset. Connection to The Nature Conservancy’s destination offset program page is established solely as a starting point for browsing from the myriad offset program options available for personal contribution. None of these programs, nor the projects they fund, are supported, sponsored or specifically endorsed by CBRE, Inc. They are made available only as a service to users participating in CBRE’s carbon calculator tool and interested in exploring their carbon offsetting options.

Your Behavior
Breakdown

U.S. Average Behavior Breakdown

Yes, You Can!

Offsetting your carbon footprint will typically sequester carbon over the next 70 years. But you can start taking steps now to change your behavior and reduce your impact on the environment.

How was your carbon footprint calculated?

General Information

This carbon calculator determines carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions for personal and household behaviors. The following information explains how emissions are calculated.

Reporting

Greenhouse gas emissions are typically reported worldwide in metric tons. Carbon dioxide emissions are calculated from the weight of carbon. Other emissions, such as methane and nitrous oixde, are reported in carbon dioxide equivalents so that the emissions can be compared. Short tons (equivalent to 2,000 lb.) are the units used to report emissions in this calculator. One metric ton can be converted to short tons by multiplying the total by 1.1023.

References to "CO2 emissions" or "carbon emissions" typically include emissions from all greenhouse gasses.


Emissions Calculations

For this calculator, emissions attributed directly from individual behaviors, such as miles flown, as well as indirect emissions, such as the CO2 emitted in building airports, are included in the overall emissions calculation.

Total Emissions Per Person

In 2004, the United States emitted 7074 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent green house gasses1. This equates to 27 tons per person2. In this calculator, direct emissions (calculated from home energy use, personal transportation, diet and waste) make up 45% of the total U.S. emissions, with the remaining 55% representing indirect emissions.

To determine the indirect emissions for each user, we apply an indirect emissions factor to all personal behaviors. This is simply the ratio of total U.S. CO2 emissions to the total emissions for the personal behaviors we are considering. For example, direct emissions from one long flight is approximately 1 ton and indirect emissions add 1.2 tons, for total emissions of 2.2 tons. The emissions for specific behaviors included in the calculator are documented below.

For the specific behaviors evaluated in the calculator, we rely on data regarding typical consumption to determine an average contribution. In most cases, we also calculate high and low endpoints for each behavior. These three points are used to frame the specific responses for each behavior. For example, we used data from residential energy surveys to determine the average maximum emissions for a household that has not implemented energy saving behaviors and the average minimum for a household that has implemented many energy savings behaviors.


Home Energy

Home energy emissions are based directly on how much electricity and other fuels are used in your home. This is determined from the cost or kilowatt hours entered for each heating or cooling season, multiplied over the months in each season, plus yearly energy consumption entered for other fuels. State is used to determine carbon dioxide equivalent emissions per kilowatt hour of electricity3. 2010 cost data per state for electricity is used to determine kilowatt hours from cost.4


Transportation

Personal Vehicles

Average: Emissions factors are determined based on the type of car selected and then multiplied by the number of miles driven per car, assuming gasoline-based vehicles.5

Air Travel

Average: Air travel per-mile emissions are significantly affected by the length of the flight because a high percentage of fuel use and emissions are expended on take-off. We estimate an average length of 300 miles for a short flight.6


Lifestyle

Food & Diet

Average: Agricultural activity (crop, land, and animal including management, and including farm vehicles) accounts for 7% of all greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, with 91% of that being from methane and nitrous oxide emissions.7

Behaviors: Vegan and vegetarian diets emit 72% and 42% less than the typical American diet, respectively. A heavy meat diet emits 24% more than the average.8 For the organic food responses, "Most of the time" reduces your emissions by 29%, "Sometimes" reduces emissions by 15%, and "Never or rarely" is the average emissions figure. 9

Recycling and Waste

Average: 246 million short tons of waste were landfilled in 2004.10 This produces 2.1 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent greenhouse gases per year per person.11

Behaviors: Recycling household trash can reduce your overall waste stream, and thus emissions by 42%.12 Composting can reduce emissions by 24%.13


Results

Averages are based on US EPA Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks14 and behavior emissions (savings or additions) are determined from the answers submitted.

World average for greenhouse gas emissions are 3.2 billion metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. This equates to 5.5 short tons per person.15

Sources

1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2004. Executive Summary. 2006.

2. U.S. Census Bureau. National and State Population Estimates. 2006.

3. U.S. Energy Information Administration. Updated State-Level Greenhouse Gas Emission Coefficients for Electricity Generation 1998-2000. Table 1. 1998-2000 Average State-level Carbon Dioxide Emissions Coefficients for Electric Power. April 2002.

4. U.S. Energy Information Administration. Table 5.6.A. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, July 2010 and 2009.

5. UK DEFRA (Table 7, Annexes to Guidelines for Company Reporting on Greenhouse Gas Emissions, updated July 2005), UK DEFRA (Table 2, Annexes to Guidelines for Company Reporting on Greenhouse Gas Emissions, updated July 2005) and Average Fuel Economy of (Civic, Escape, Prius, Insight – Adjusted 55/45) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Light-Duty Automotive Technology and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Through 2006, Appendix B: Model Year 2006 Nameplate Fuel Economy Listings

6. Emission Factors for short haul and long haul flights from UK DEFRA (Table 9, Annexes to Guidelines for Company Reporting on Greenhouse Gas Emissions, updated July 2005).

7. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2004. Table 6-1, Table A-104. 2006.

8. Martin, Pamela A. and Gidon Eshel, "Diet, Energy, and Global Warming". Earth Interactions. 2006. Paper 10-1009.

9. Pimentel, D., et. al. "Environmental, Energetic, and Economic Comparisons of Organic and Conventional Farming Systems" Bioscience (Vol. 55:7)

10. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Municipal Solid Waste in the United States: 2005 Facts and Figures. Table ES-1. 2005.

11. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2004. Table 8-1. 2006.

12. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Personal GHG Calculator.

13. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Municipal Solid Waste in the United States. Figure ES-3. Composting can reduce emissions by 25%.

14. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2004. Tables: 3-6, A-104, A-106, 6-1, and 8-1. 2006.

15. U.S. Energy Information Administration. Greenhouse Gases, Climate Change, and Energy. 2004